Saturday, June 9, 2012

Office365 Migration Series: Email Migration


Part 3: Addressing Personal Archives As Part of the Migration

Market: Experience has shown that most migrations take one of three paths to address personal archives as part of a migration. It is very rare that at the end of a migration that some disposition is not taken to account for legacy data. I have had some great clients who had started with a “no personal archive migration” position but eventually came around due to business unit intervention or certain executives or senior folks within the organization driving the need to have access to this data.

1.     Migrate all personal archives in their entirety into the new messaging environment so all relevant data is in a centralized location against which appropriate decisions can be made to address the data once an understanding of what actually exists is available.

Pros:
·       Re-establishes organizational control over the data
·       Significantly reduces the cost of data gathering, collection and preparation for the reviewing stage as part any future litigation
·       Mitigates the risk of inferred spoliation
·       Allows for consistent enforcement of a retention schedule for email

Cons:
·       The cost of migration is much higher than other options due to an extended migration period
·       More resource intensive as the frequency of edge cases and corruption increases as the data agaes
·       Specifically to the cloud environments where mailbox size limitations of 25 GB play a factor, more data means the potential of a bloated mailbox from the offsite with risk of overage in the future
·       As there is a message limitation in Office 365, messages larger than 25 MB would not be migrated

2.     Migrate all personal archives in their entirety into a migration archive at which point an organizational decision can be made as to how much total data will be maintained by the organization and for what length of time. Data outside the range is purged and the remaining data is migrated to the new messaging environment.
  
Pros:
·       Re-establishes organizational control over the data
·       Significantly reduces the cost of data gathering, collection and preparation for the reviewing stage as part any future litigation
·       Reduces the risk of inferred spoliation as destruction is based on policy
·       Allows for consistent enforcement of a retention schedule for email
·       Migration costs are lower than option 1 and the migration period is shortened
·       Reduced bloat factor in the new user mailbox

Cons:
·       The cost of migration still needs to account for the additional data being migrated from personal archives into the new environment and the associated resources and time to accomplish this task
·       Frequency of edge cases and corruption increases as the data becomes older still plays a factor but less so with a reduced length of time
·       As there is a message limitation in Office 365, messages larger than 25 MB would not be migrated

3.     Best Practices Approach: Migrate all personal archives in their entirety into a migration archive at which point an organizational decision is made as to how much total data will be maintained by the organization and for what length of time. Data outside the range is purged in accordance with the policy. No data is migrated to the new system but end users have access to their data from the web portal within the Outlook client.

Pros:
·       Reestablishes organizational control over the data
·       Significantly reduces the cost of data gathering, collection and preparation for the reviewing stage as part any future litigation
·       Reduces the risk of inferred spoliation as destruction is based on policy
·       Allows for consistent enforcement of a retention schedule for email
·       Migration costs are significantly lower than options 1 & 2 and the migration period is shortened
·       Reduced bloat factor in the new user mailbox and the application of the production mailbox limitation is maintained
·       There is no message size limitation in the archive so larger messages will still be accessible from the archive view

Cons:
·       Frequency of edge cases and corruption increases as the data becomes older still plays a factor but less so with a reduced length of time

Challenges: The current approach will have a significant impact on end users if you take away personal archive access and risk a much higher future litigation cost in order to produce data from this legacy source which will be co-mingled with new Exchange production data and potential Exchange archive data. The situation is becoming very messy very quickly.

Key Questions to Ask

  1. Were end users instructed to move information that is considered a business record to personal archives? 
  1. Were end users instructed to move information that is compliance- or litigation-related to personal archives?
  1. If you have allowed personal archive data, do you really have a 60 day policy that is defensible? 
  1. How will you address the workflow of personal archives when in the cloud? 
  1. If you allow archives in the cloud, then do you have a 60 day policy?

Interesting Case and Article to Consider:

Obstruction of the Discovery Process: Understanding Email

http://www.ediscoverylawreview.com/2010/04/articles/sanctions/obstruction-of-the-discovery-process-understanding-email/


Personal Email Archives: Do They Amount To IT Malpractice?

No comments:

Post a Comment